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Develop and grow your business with our network of local specialists behind you

Working with Reed, you don't have to go it alone. With over 60 year's experience in specialist recruitment, our dedicated consultants work with you to find talented professionals, to help your business flourish.

We have access to

22 m

candidate CV's worldwide

We have a

4.9

average rating on Google

Somebody starts a job every

5 min

through Reed

love our expertise

Shanice Abela

Shanice Abela

HR Officer

Michael Potelli Madden

Michael Potelli Madden

General Manaager

Lucie Chaldová

Lucie Chaldová

Recruiter

Kate McCole

Kate McCole

Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bro Edern, Community school

Maree Persen

Maree Persen

The Children's Trust

Michael Jenkins

Michael Jenkins

VVB Engineering Ltd

Shanice Abela

Reed has always been a very professional agency to work with. Very patient and does their best to understand a client's needs.

Michael Potelli Madden

​Reed has great attention to detail and is responsive to their client's needs. They provide a "one-to-one" recruitment service, ensuring both employer and candidate are the optimum match and best cultural fit for each other. Definitely recommended.

Lucie Chaldová

​​Highly professional approach combined with Reed's ability to create friendly and welcoming environment for the candidates is something that really works - for Reed, for us and mainly for the candidates. This win-win-win situation makes them exceptional.

Kate McCole

​I came into register as a candidate on Wednesday, had an interview on Thursday and was offered the job on the same day! I don't think I could ask for much more!

Maree Persen

​The main difference between Reed and other agencies is that I've never felt like "just another candidate", or "just another client".

Michael Jenkins

​The only agency that kept their word and called when they said they would. I felt I was always being listened to and received frank and honest feedback.

What's happening

How to create a great recruitment strategy
2 mins read

How to create a great recruitment strategy

​Getting your recruitment strategy right is key to hitting your business goals. Here are some expert tips to help you set up your company for success – and the shortcuts to keep you ahead of your competition.

​What is a recruitment strategy?

A recruitment strategy is a clear plan that explains what roles you’ll recruit for, when, why and how. It should be tied to your overall company objectives.

Your strategy must be possible to implement and easy to communicate. While you can tweak your tactics, the strategy must always be clear.

Unsure how many employees you’ll need? Hiring temporary staff helps you expand quickly and risk free.

The core aspects of a great recruitment strategy

Growth Plans

  • In order to scale up your workforce, you’ll need to hire – which takes time and resources.

  • Create a measure to help you identify which areas of your business will benefit most from increased headcount.

  • This could focus on return on investment or opportunities lost.

Shortcut: Unsure how many new employees you’ll need? A recruitment agency will give you access to temporary staff and contractors to help you expand quickly and risk free.

Employer Brand

  • Make sure your employer brand and message are attractive to your target audience, particularly over social media. A well-known brand is a big selling point to talented job hunters.

  • Be open and transparent about the company’s working culture to ensure you attract candidates that will match your business.

Shortcut: If your brand isn’t well known, a recruitment agency can contact candidates directly and spend time promoting your employer messages.

Skills Audit

  • Use your company objectives to identify developing areas of the business, then decide on the skills you will need to succeed.

  • Your recruitment strategy should include ways to find and bring new skills into the company.

  • Employers often focus on advanced digital and technical skills, but you should also consider bringing in candidates with different experiences.

Shortcut: When interviewing for a role you’ve never done yourself, your recruitment consultant can offer interview tips and support to build your confidence.

"You can tweak your tactics, but your end goals must be clear."

Flexibility

  • If your company needs to adapt quickly to an unpredictable market then hiring permanent staff may not be the right option.

  • Your strategy should include a plan for temporary staff and contractors to cover projects that are likely to change at short notice.

Shortcut: Unless you already have an advanced payroll function, it makes sense to ask your recruitment agency to manage payroll for your temporary workforce. They look after tax, holiday pay and even pension contributions – saving you a lot of hassle.

When to review your recruitment strategy

You should always be thinking about how you differentiate your company from your competitors, and how you can be a more attractive prospect for potential candidates.

Pay close attention to all aspects of the recruitment process, and make tactical tweaks throughout the year when necessary – while holding firm to your recruitment strategy.

You should review your overall recruitment strategy annually to make sure it ties in with your wider business objectives. It’s important that everyone in the company understands your goals – so be clear and concise about what success looks like and how you will get there.

Top 10 competency-based interview questions to find the perfect candidate
3 mins read
  1. Article

Top 10 competency-based interview questions to find the perfect candidate

This list of competency-based questions encourage interviewees to use real-life examples in their answers. You get to understand how a candidate made a decision, and see the outcome of their actions.

Our top ten list of competency-based interview questions will help you recruit the skills your team needs.

1. What are your greatest strengths?

This is a classic interview question, and with good reason.

It’s a chance for your candidate to prove they have the right skills for the role. Keep the job description in mind to see whether the interviewee understands how their skills relate to the role.

Remember you’re looking for transferable skills, not proof that they’ve done the role before.

2. What will your skills and ideas bring to this company?

This competency-based question is an opportunity to see which of your candidates stand out from the crowd.

A good candidate will show an understanding of your company goals within their answer. A great candidate will offer practical examples of how their skills can help you achieve that vision.

3. What have you achieved elsewhere?

Confidence is key in this competency-based question. It gives your candidate an opportunity to talk about previous successes and experiences that relate to your vacancy.

Make sure the achievements you take away from their answers are work-related and relevant to what you’re looking for.

4. How have you improved in the last year?

Candidates can tie themselves up in knots trying to disguise their weaknesses. This competency-based interview question is a chance to show a willingness to learn from their mistakes.

It’s also an opportunity to test the candidate’s level of self-awareness and desire to develop.

"Competency-based interview questions ask for real-life examples to show a candidate’s skills."

5. Tell me about a time you supported a member of your team who was struggling

This competency-based question will test your candidate’s ability to show compassion towards their colleagues without losing sight of their own objectives.

Those further along in their career should be able to reference training or mentoring that not only helped their co-worker but also improved team performance.

6. Give an example of a time you’ve had to improvise to achieve your goal

In other words: “Can you think on your feet?” It is increasingly important to be able to react to unexpected situations.

The candidate’s answer should highlight their ability to keep their cool and perform in a scenario they haven’t prepared for.

7. What was the last big decision you had to make?

The answer to this question should be a window into your candidate’s decision-making process and whether their reasoning is appropriate for your role.

This is a competency-based question designed to highlight how an interviewee makes decisions. Do they use logical reasoning? Gut intuition? However they manage big decisions, does their approach match what you’re looking for?

8. Tell me about a time you dealt with a difficult person

All candidates should be able to reference an experience of working with a challenging colleague. Look for them to approach this question with honesty and a clear example of working through the experience.

Rather than passing blame, there should be a recognition of the part they have played in the situation, and how they might tackle it differently next time.

It’s essential to get a sense of how candidates would fit and thrive within your company culture.

9. What was the last thing you taught?

You’ve asked the interviewee about their skills, but can they show a capability for teaching others about these skills?

This question isn’t restricted to managerial or senior roles, and should be asked whenever you’re looking for a candidate who will add value to your team.

10. Why are you a good fit for this company?

The key to this competency-based question is whether the candidate can explain how their transferable skills would fit your role. This tests both an awareness of their own abilities and an understanding of what you are looking for in a new employee.

The candidate should be able to confidently explain why they want to work for your company, and convince you that they would fit your team culture.

If you’re interested in learning more about interviews, please contact your local recruitment specialist.​

8 ways to get a job with no experience
2 mins read
  1. Article

8 ways to get a job with no experience

​You need experience to get a job, but you need a job to get experience... How do you get your foot on the ladder? Whether you're fresh out of education or looking to follow a new career path, feeling like you don't have the experience to land that first job can be frustrating. So, here are some of the ways you can achieve the (seemingly) impossible and get a job with no experience!

Address the issue

If you lack experience, don't try to brush over the fact. A cover letter is the perfect place to address any gaps in your CV, so use the opportunity to address any concerns the employer might have. Then...

Focus on what you DO have

Experience is important, but so is your attitude to work, your personality, your understanding of the company and its activity, motivation, resilience, ideas for the future - the list is endless, so don't get too hung up on any one thing.

Find experience you didn't know you had

Before you decide you don't have the experience, make absolutely sure this is true. Think back over your past jobs and try to draw links between the experience you need and the experience you have. Remember: it needn't be exactly the same; the key word to keep in mind is relevant. If you've organised a meeting or answered the phones, that's admin experience. If you've set up a Facebook page or created a flier, that's marketing. Think outside the box!

Create some experience

Do some voluntary work, work experience, or an internship.​

“ Don't be afraid to start from scratch. Getting your foot in the door is crucial, and you never know what might come next. ”​

But (as above) make sure the experience you're getting is relevant. If you're still taking your first steps, don't waste time with unrelated work, especially if it's unpaid!

Demonstrate your intent

If you really want to get into a particular industry, make sure that people know about it. Get involved in relevant industry discussions on LinkedIn, join relevant groups, attend networking and careers events, and make sure you make your enthusiasm public.

Apply speculatively

If you only apply for advertised jobs, you're going to be assessed against set criteria. Apply speculatively to companies that interest you, demonstrate you've done your research, and ask if there's any opportunities for you as you're looking to break into the industry. If the answer is no, ask if you can apply again in 6 months, and find out what you can do in the meantime to improve your chances.

Network

If you don't have the desired level of experience, you need to be trustworthy. Network, and get your contacts to recommend you. Employers are more likely to overlook the gap in your experience if you come with a recommendation from someone they can trust. Find out more about effectiveness networking.