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Corporate Legal Secretary

40,000-50,000 EUR (Euro) Per annum, inc Benefits, Salary Negotiable

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Dublin

Litigation Legal Secretary

35,000-45,000 EUR (Euro) Per annum, inc Benefits, Salary Negotiable

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Dublin

Commercial Contracts Solicitor

95,000-105,000 EUR (Euro) Per annum, inc Benefits, Salary Negotiable

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Nenagh

Accounts Payable Clerk

37,000-42,000 EUR (Euro) Per annum, inc Benefits

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Dublin

Accounting Technician

38,000-45,000 EUR (Euro) Per annum, inc Benefits

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Dublin

Accommodation Supervisor

31,200-31,200 EUR (Euro) Per annum, inc Benefits

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Develop and grow your business with our network of local specialists behind you

Working with Reed, you don't have to go it alone. With over 60 year's experience in specialist recruitment, our dedicated consultants work with you to find talented professionals, to help your business flourish.

We have access to

22 m

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Somebody starts a job every

5 min

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love our expertise

Shanice Abela

Shanice Abela

HR Officer

Michael Potelli Madden

Michael Potelli Madden

General Manaager

Lucie Chaldová

Lucie Chaldová

Recruiter

Kate McCole

Kate McCole

Ysgol Gyfun Gymraeg Bro Edern, Community school

Maree Persen

Maree Persen

The Children's Trust

Michael Jenkins

Michael Jenkins

VVB Engineering Ltd

Shanice Abela

Reed has always been a very professional agency to work with. Very patient and does their best to understand a client's needs.

Michael Potelli Madden

​Reed has great attention to detail and is responsive to their client's needs. They provide a "one-to-one" recruitment service, ensuring both employer and candidate are the optimum match and best cultural fit for each other. Definitely recommended.

Lucie Chaldová

​​Highly professional approach combined with Reed's ability to create friendly and welcoming environment for the candidates is something that really works - for Reed, for us and mainly for the candidates. This win-win-win situation makes them exceptional.

Kate McCole

​I came into register as a candidate on Wednesday, had an interview on Thursday and was offered the job on the same day! I don't think I could ask for much more!

Maree Persen

​The main difference between Reed and other agencies is that I've never felt like "just another candidate", or "just another client".

Michael Jenkins

​The only agency that kept their word and called when they said they would. I felt I was always being listened to and received frank and honest feedback.

What's happening

How to ace your video interview
2 mins read
  1. Article

How to ace your video interview

​​Use the following video interviewing tips to help you secure your next role.

There are two types of video interview

Live interviews are what you would expect – a video call with the interviewer which is very similar to a face-to-face interview, but slightly different. Some may feel more relaxed knowing that they are speaking face-to-face with a person, even if it’s only through a screen.

Pre-recorded interviews provide you with questions you must answer by recording yourself. These interviews are usually recorded with specialist software, such as Shine, and you will have a certain number of attempts to answer each question.

Check your tech

Test your microphone, camera and internet connection before you start, and make sure your device is compatible with the software your interviewer is using. Making a test call will give you piece of mind that everything is set up correctly.

In case of any unexpected audio issues, or your connection drops, ensure you have the interviewer’s contact number so that you can continue your interview over the phone. Don’t forget to fully charge your device or have it plugged in to avoid any potential disruption from a low battery.

Just as you would in a face-to-face interview, you must also check that your phone is on silent and any notifications are off.

Framing

To frame yourself well, position yourself in the centre of the screen, with the camera at eye-level, an arm’s length away. If you give the illusion of eye-contact by looking at the camera, you will seem more engaging to the interviewer. The interviewer will have a better impression of you, and will be more engaged in your answers.

It is most important to choose a location where you won’t be disturbed and are least likely to pick up noise from your surroundings. Choose a space which is not too dark or too bright and remove anything from behind you that you wouldn’t want your employer to see, such as dirty clothes.

Body language and appearance

Be as professional as possible, both in how you dress and in your body language – remember that this is your potential employer. Even if the interviewer can’t see all of you, dressing well will put you in the right mindset for a job interview and you will make a much better impression.

Other than your facial expression and hand gestures, your non-verbal communication is limited, so it will be more difficult for the interviewer to pick up positive body language. Ensure you don’t fidget too much, avoid covering your mouth, and make sure to smile.

Our YouTube channel has a fantastic series of interviewing advice videos detailing the dos and don’ts for candidates.

If you’re looking for a new career opportunity, contact your local office via email or over the phone.

Induction checklist for new staff (downloadable template)
less than one minute
  1. Article

Induction checklist for new staff (downloadable template)

​​Inductions are vital to ensuring new staff settle into an organisation and make a positive impact. Using a straightforward induction checklist can make onboarding simpler and more effective.

A concise and well-structured induction checklist for new staff can heighten the entire induction process, helping any new member of the team to get up to speed quickly and efficiently.

An induction checklist can remove some of the pressures that managers and HR professionals face when effectively onboarding new team members.

Our downloadable induction checklist includes:

  • First day tasks

  • First week tasks

  • First month tasks

  • Tasks after three months

  • Tasks after six months

While checklists are helpful in ensuring best practice and a thorough employee experience, they shouldn’t turn the induction into a tick-box exercise. Our free induction checklist template is designed to simplify the onboarding process and support your new starters through their first six months.

Whether you are looking for guidance to use across your own company, or interested in learning more about what you need to include, this comprehensive checklist is an indispensable tool to help you and your new employees.

Best practice for creating an induction checklist for new staff
5 mins read
  1. Article

Best practice for creating an induction checklist for new staff

​​Inductions are vital to ensuring new staff settle into an organisation and make a positive impact. Using a straightforward induction checklist can make onboarding simpler and more effective.

A concise and well-structured induction checklist for new staff can heighten the entire induction process, leading to seamless onboarding and, most importantly, allowing the new starter to hit the ground running.

Using an induction checklist can remove some of the pressures managers and HR professionals face. We examine everything you need to know about an induction checklist.

What is an induction checklist?

An induction checklist outlines the activities set for a new employee to complete within the initial stages of their employment. Its purpose is to ensure objectives are met and organisational matters are understood and to avoid omission or duplication of information.

A staple of the onboarding process, an induction checklist is a critical tool that has proven success in effectively managing new starters. It doesn’t, however, cover tasks that need to be done before the new employee arrives. Equipment, uniform, passwords and software access should be planned well in advance so that the new starter has everything they need from day one.

The benefits of creating an induction checklist

An induction checklist helps your employee settle in quickly, giving them a sense of direction from the start of their career at an organisation. This will improve their overall productivity, through the checklist’s set tasks aimed at increasing their knowledge of the company, their rights and, ultimately, their responsibilities. Induction checklists don’t just benefit employees, they can also make a manager’s job simpler.

During the induction process, an induction plan template helps ensure the right materials, policies, procedures, and workflows are all actioned and accounted for.

Using a staff induction template prepares the new employee for each step, reducing any anxiety, while also making sure all necessary administrative areas are covered. A well-structured checklist can ensure the smooth running of the induction process and can also be transferable to most roles across multiple sectors.

What should be included in an induction checklist?

The activities and tasks listed in an induction checklist vary from organisation to organisation, depending on various elements including the size of the company and the sector or industry they fall under. Popular inclusions are as follows:

Employee's personal information

This section includes the name of the employee, their job title, staff ID number and start date. Some employee induction templates also include a detailed list of all paperwork that needs to be compiled and submitted to human resources on the first day (passport, p45, qualifications etc.).

First day tasks

Ensuring that new employees are familiar with their surroundings and the people around them is crucial on the first day of work. New employees should meet fellow team members and relevant managers, be assigned a workstation, issued with office ID badges and given a tour of the facility.

Introduction to the company

An introduction to the company should be conducted within the first week of the new starter joining the business. This gives the new employee the chance to learn more about the company's history, values, management style, objectives, products and services, organisational structure, and key stakeholders.

Introduction to the role

Most importantly, the employee will need an understanding of how they fit into the organisation, their day-to-day tasks that integrate into the company's practices, their main responsibilities and priorities, as well as department-wide goals and objectives.

Terms of employment, such as pension contributions, working hours, pay, lunch breaks, annual leave and claims and expenses should also be covered.

Induction checklists should also include an organisation's code of conduct, discipline, absenteeism, and relevant policies. Other information such as office dress code, operating procedures and use of company resources need to be relayed to the employee.

Health and safety

New employees will need to attend training to learn the company's health and safety policies, including first aid, safety measures, emergency evacuations, firm alarm drills, as well as the location of fire extinguishers and first aid kits.

One month review

After one month in the role, it would be worth the new starter having an extended one-on-one meeting with their line manager to evaluate how they are adjusting to their role and whether there is a need for further training or development.

Three-month review

The line manager should hold further discussions with the employee to review performance, pinpoint areas of improvement and set longer-term objectives, while adjusting any targets if the employee is either up to speed or slightly behind.

Six-month review

If the employee is on a six-month probation, this is the point to decide whether to retain them, release them, or extend the probation if needed. If the new starter passes their probation period, objectives will then need to be set for the next six months. The six-month mark presents a prime opportunity to ask the employee for feedback on the induction process, what they think worked well and what they feel could be improved.

Do remote employees need an induction checklist?

They may not be in the office, but that doesn’t mean remote employees don’t need an induction checklist. In fact, an induction is even more important to remote employees, who can often feel isolated or become inadvertently left out.  

As remote onboarding becomes more common, use of an induction checklist should eventually become standard practice. 

Our free induction checklist template is designed to simplify the onboarding process and support your new starters through their first six months. 

Whether you are looking for guidance to use across your own company, or interested in learning more about what you need to include, our comprehensive checklist is an indispensable tool to help you and your new employees.

Download the free checklist now.